Construction and COVID-19

Installing gutter during the current crisis

During these difficult times it is still necessary to maintain and protect our biggest investment, our homes.  I have been asked if we are able to work with Govenor Whitmer's Executive Order in place.  The answer as I understand it is: Maybe.  Depending on the situation I believe it is permissible.   I have received information from the state licensing board regarding this.  The Executive order in it's entirety is linked at the bottom.  


 

The following is the information that the Bureau of Construction Codes has been provided from the Governor's Office regarding construction.

Q: Is construction allowed under the executive order?

A: Some limited forms of construction are permissible, including construction to maintain and improve essential public works like roads, bridges, the telecommunications infrastructure, and public health infrastructure. Construction workers may also undertake such projects as necessary to maintain and improve the safety, sanitation, and essential operations of residences. In addition, businesses may designate construction firms to provide necessary support to the work of the businesses' critical infrastructure workers. All construction work that is carried out while the order is in effect must be done in accordance with the mitigation measures required under section 5(c) of the order.

Please review the attached Executive Order 2020-21 for further information.


This is also of interest and is a National Association of Home Builders article regarding residential construction and maintenance.  


 

Filed in Construction Industry, Disaster Response, Home Building, Multifamily on March 28, 2020    

In a critical win for NAHB and the residential construction sector, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) today designated construction of single-family and multifamily housing as an “Essential Infrastructure Business.”

The designation will enable many home building firms to keep their businesses open during the COVID-19 pandemic and help to stabilize the housing industry and its supply chain in the near term. More detail about the construction workers who qualify as essential can be found in both the “Public Works and Infrastructure Support Services” and “Residential/Facilities and Services” sections of the guidance.

Keep in mind that there is no mandatory federal order on what is an essential business, and many states have their own rules. This is guidance from DHS that states can follow. Therefore, in states where only essential businesses are allowed to keep operations going during the coronavirus epidemic, residential construction workers should continue to be allowed to stay on the job.

NAHB was at the forefront among all housing groups in calling on DHS to make this designation.

“Americans depend on a functioning residential construction sector to provide safe, affordable housing for our citizens, and this need is especially acute during this pandemic,” said NAHB Chairman Dean Mon. “Moreover, a healthy housing market is critical to maintain a sound economy. I commend DHS for heeding the urgent concerns of the housing community and taking this decisive action to assure the men and women of the industry will be able to stay on the job and serve the needs of the American people at this critical time.”

On March 26, in an effort spearheaded by NAHB, 90 companies and organizations sent a joint letter to Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Jack Wolf urging him to designate the construction of single-family and multifamily housing as an Essential Infrastructure Business.

“As cities and states issue declarations and public health orders as a result of the crisis, it is essential that communities have access to our professionals to build and maintain essential services including: building, plumbing, residential property management, rental housing operators, roofing, electrical, HVAC systems, waste/wastewater treatment plants and power generations,” the letter stated. “Home construction, including those industries listed above, should be designated as ‘essential’ because it is necessary to maintain safety, sanitation, and economic security.”

The safety and health of all those who work in construction remains our top priority. The industry continues to adhere to all public health guidelines set forth by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). Working on a new unfinished home site occurs primarily outdoors and does not involve going onto a location occupied by residents or a public location, and there is minimal (if any) physical or transactional contact with customers.

Access the latest NAHB news and business resources to respond to this challenge at the Coronavirus Preparedness and Response section on nahb.org.




 If you are concerned about potential or continuing water damage to your home or business please call or email us for a free evaluation.   We have a no contact policy in place for those who prefer and we adhere to social distancing recommendations for everyone's safety and health.